lunes, 14 de agosto de 2017

NASA's smartest satellite is gone. Can private space replace it?

It follows one article published on August 9th on WIRED website, highlighting the success of Satellogic at providing scientists its hyperspectral data for free.

NASA'S SMARTEST SATELLITE IS GONE. CAN PRIVATE SPACE REPLACE IT?

LOOK DOWN ON Buenos Aires from the sky, and you can learn a fair bit about the city. It's got a lot of concrete. Also a lot of trees. There's a bright green river delta to the north, which probably explains the ruddy-brown bay to the east. But with the right camera—a hyperspectral one—you can pick up a whole lot more. New colors emerge, hidden hues your eyes and mine aren't wired to see. And these colors reflect even more detail about the scene: the gases coming out of the city, the health of the plants surrounding it, the species of algae coloring the water offshore.


Scientists love pointing hyperspectral cameras at the Earth to analyze things like crop health, or the mineral content of exposed soil. But there aren't many spectroscopic satellites in orbit: The US decommissioned one of the best, called Hyperion, earlier this year. So a private company called Satellogic wants to give scientists its data for free—the company plans to have 300 spectroscopic satellites in orbit by the early 2020s.

viernes, 4 de agosto de 2017

Satellogic pondrá en órbita dos nuevos satélites comerciales

SATELLOGIC PONDRÁ EN ÓRBITA DOS NUEVOS SATÉLITES COMERCIALES

Por Javier García, ArgentinaEnElEspacio

Según inforó el CEO de la compañía Emiliano Kargieman a través de su cuenta de Twitter, dos nuevos satélites, llamados Ñusat-4 (Ada) y Ñusat-5 (Maryam) se encuentran listos para ser enviados a la República Popular China donde serán lanzados al espacio.

Ñusat-4 y Ñusat-5. Foto: Satellogic.

Ambos satélites formarán parte de la constelación comercial Aleph-1, desarrollada y operada por Satellogic S.A, la cual estará conformada por 25 satélites en órbita LEO, y que actualmente cuenta con 3 naves en órbita.